Books to Read If You Love “Little Fires Everywhere”

by Maryssa Orta

Were you were a fan of Little Fires Everywhere on Hulu or just finished the book?? Craving more drama and domestic fiction? The story is so addicting, so of course, you would want some more. Well, here are 9 books to read and help you venture into similar worlds of Celeste Ng’s “Little Fires Everywhere.”

The books to read

“Everything I Never Told You” by Celeste Ng

Start off with another Celeste Ng book — “Everything I Never Told You” is the story of a Chinese-American family as they find their middle daughter, Lydia, drowned in a lake. An intense, and captivating story of a family who has lost a lot.

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Look! It's my book! In the oldest bookshop in London!

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“Educated” by Tara Westover

The only nonfiction book on this list — “Educated” tells the life of it’s author, Tara Westover, as she leaves her Mormon family to attend college, how everything had affected her, and how important it really is to receive an education.

“Big Little Lies” by Laine Moriarty

This book also has its own TV show adaptation. This story is about a seemingly perfect community, yet rumors and division threaten to take it all down. Five women become entangled into a murder investigation as well. Tension filled and drama ridden!

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loving all the #internationalwomensday content

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“All the Light We Cannot See” by Anthony Doerr

Another book to read if you loved “Little Fires Everywhere” is “All the Light We Cannot See.” This book is a historical fiction about a German boy and a blind French girl who meet through occupied France in World War II. Both parties try to survive the aftermath of the war.

“Where the Crawdads Sing” by Delia Owens

This story explores the rumor of the “Marsh Girl” who haunts the small town in North Carolina. One day a man is found dead and everyone is quick to blame the “Marsh Girl,” Kya Clark, yet she isn’t exactly what the locals claim she is. A mystery drama that’s very compelling.

“Commonwealth” by Ann Patchett

Commonwealth” by Ann Patchett is a domestic fiction novel that tells of an affair that ends up destroying two marriages and a family unit that everyone hesitates to join. A perfect example of domestic fiction and another great book to read.

“The Joy Luck Club” by Amy Tan

This book tells the story of four Chinese-American immigrants who start a club, called The Joy Luck Club, to play mahjong and eat a variety of food. However, this book also tells the story of the immigrants’ American born daughters. One of them trying to find her long-lost half sisters in China.

“An American Marriage” by Tayari Jones

An American Marriage” tells the story of a married, middle-class, Black couple living in Atlanta. Suddenly their world changes as Roy, the husband, is accused of a crime he didn’t commit. The winner of the NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literary Work — Fiction, this novel focuses more on marriage than the entire family unit, yet is still a wonderful piece of work and a book to read!

“The Poisonwood Bible” by Barbara Kingsolver

This book is about the Price family and their missionary trip to Kilanga in the Belgian Congo. Tensions in the family begin to rise as mother and daughters defy the overbearing religious father. Though much longer than “Little Fires Everywhere” it’s still worth a read as it’s topics of family, race, and more shine through.

Begin your journey into tense domestic fiction piled with plenty of other themes that resonate today! Enjoy these books to read if you loved “Little Fires Everywhere.”

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