Deviled Eggs

These deviled eggs are the perfect healthy snack, make a great addition to any lunch, and are simply delicious! The recipe is simple and leaves room for mindfulness or getting caught up on your audio-book, podcast, or favorite binge-worthy TV show!

Deviled Eggs

I love making deviled eggs because you never have to make them the same way twice! This recipe is a great place to start, but don’t be afraid to make it a little differently next time. I remember as a child, deviled eggs were always a confusing creation. “You take the yolks out and then put them back?” I asked my grandmother. “Well, yeah. I don’t really like hard-boiled eggs, but I love deviled eggs.” I didn’t have the attention span to listen to any more reasoning than that, especially when her answer only confused me further. I didn’t know that deviled eggs had more ingredients than simply eggs, much less that the whipped yolks lent a new variety of textures. In this recipe, I use a few of the traditional ingredients, but I also throw in a few special twists. I chose to swap the typical white vinegar for lime juice to create a more complicated flavor profile. The typical yellow mustard is swapped for Dijon for the same reason. The final secret ingredient is olive oil for added richness and a creamy final texture.

Deviled Eggs Ingredients:

  • One dozen eggs. I’m using pasture-raised eggs here; healthier eggs will have heavier yolks and therefore be a tiny bit harder to peel in one spot. Trust me, it’s worth it. They taste way better, and you feel better for eating them!
  • Lime juice. I used a full lime, which made the final product a bit sour. I liked it that way, but you may want to start with just a half. I’ve said it before and I’ll keep saying it: taste as you go!
  • Pickle Juice. Any pickle juice will work here, use your favorite style. 
  • Dijon Grey Poupon. Using nice mustard when you’ll really taste it is a no-brainer. I’m using the fanciest (and only) mustard that’s already in my fridge; pick your favorite mustard and don’t be afraid to class it up with some nice mustard!
  • Mayonnaise. I always use vegan mayonnaise because I simply prefer it. If you already have some mayo in your fridge, feel free to use that. If you don’t, I encourage you to make a small shift towards a plant-based diet. The change starts small, with each person! The planet will thank you for it in the long-run.
  • Olive oil. A little bit of olive oil in this recipe is the best choice I made while making these. The improvement made by just two measly teaspoons of olive oil is so impressive! Add this ingredient to have rich, creamy deviled eggs.
  • Salt & Pepper. Can I just take this opportunity to say something? If you haven’t invested in some nice sea salt and a black pepper mill, you’re missing out. The difference between iodized table salt and Kosher or sea salt, and that between preground pepper and fresh cracked, is unimaginable if you haven’t experienced it. I’ll step off my soapbox now. Salt and pepper to taste as per usual.

How To Make Hard-Boiled Eggs:

If you already know how to prep the eggs then you can skip ahead a bit. If not, this one’s for you!

  1. Set one dozen eggs in the bottom of a large pot.
  2. I know they say a watched pot never boils, but this isn’t one you want to walk away from. As soon as the water reaches a boil— larger bubbles coming up from the sides/bottom of the pot— turn the burner off. 
  3. Remove the pot from the burner and let stand in the hot water for 10-15 minutes. I decided to do only 10 minutes because I prefer the yolks to be a teensy bit soft to make the mixing easier and the final product a bit creamier.
  4. As soon as the time is up, transfer the eggs to an ice bath (a bowl filled with cold water and ice cubes. Let stand in the cold water for another 10-15 minutes. I only let mine stand for 7 minutes this time because I am impatient. Be better than me. 
  5. Remove from water and peel gently. A few good tips for peeling hard-boiled eggs: know when you start that some of them won’t survive and some of them will be ugly and that’s okay. An egg will more or less show you the easiest way to peel it. Putting down a kitchen towel makes for easy cleanup. Once you have all of the visible shell pieces off of the egg, a quick rinse will ensure you don’t get a crunchy surprise when eating your deviled eggs!

How to make the Eggs:

  1. Cut the eggs in half and set aside the yolks. The easiest way to do this is by tipping the egg half over a mixing bowl and gently tapping the back with a finger until the yolk falls out. 
  2. Once you have all of the yolks in a bowl, pulverize them. The easiest way to do this is with a potato masher, but if you need an excuse to break out that stand mixer, this is as good of one as any! Be sure the yolks are in small pieces; the better you break up the yolk now, the less clumpy it will be later.
  3. To the pulverized yolks, add the juice of half a lime and one tablespoon of pickle juice. Whisk to combine. The mixture will get lumpy-er before it gets smooth and creamy— don’t panic! That’s normal, just keep going.
  4. Whisk in one tablespoon of mustard (or a little more if you really like mustard, I found one tablespoon to be enough for me). Is your mixture still lumpy? Mine too. Ready for the magic transformation?
  5. Whisk in ¼ cup mayonnaise. That should be better in terms of texture. 
  6. Add two teaspoons of olive oil, and salt and pepper to taste. 

Notes:

If you want your deviled eggs to look nice and fancy, put the yolk mixture in a ziplock bag and cut the corner. Use the makeshift piping bag to make beautiful swirling centers to your deviled eggs. Garnish with flakey sea salt and freshly cracked black pepper

Alternatively, you can use a spoon to scoop some yolk mixture into the whites and devour half of them standing in your kitchen. Whichever way you’ll enjoy them the most! I like to get a piping bag and make three beautiful ones for Instagram and then inhale them. No matter how you choose to eat them, be sure to enjoy them!

Deviled Eggs
Yield: 24 Stuffed Egg Halves

Deviled Eggs

Deviled Eggs

These deviled eggs are the perfect healthy snack, make a great addition to any lunch, and are simply delicious! The recipe is simple and leaves room for mindfulness or getting caught up on your audio-book, podcast, or favorite binge-worthy TV show!

Prep Time 40 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 1 hour

Ingredients

  • 12 Hard-boiled eggs
  • Juice of half of a lime
  • 1 Tablespoons Pickle Juice
  • 1 Tablespoons Grey Poupon Dijon mustard
  • 1/4 cup Mayonnaise or Vegan Mayonnaise
  • 2 teaspoons Olive Oil
  • Salt and Pepper to taste
  • (Optional) Flaky sea salt and freshly cracked black pepper for garnish

Instructions

  1. Cut the hard-boiled eggs in half and set aside the yolks. The easiest way to do this is by tipping the egg half over a mixing bowl and gently tapping the back with a finger until the yolk falls out. 
  2. Once you have all of the yolks in a bowl, pulverize them. The easiest way to do this is with a potato masher, but if you need an excuse to break out that stand mixer, this is as good of one as any! Be sure the yolks are in small pieces; it should look thicker than dry sand but finer than wet sand. The better you break up the yolk now, the less clumpy it will be later.
  3. To the pulverized yolks, add the juice of half a lime and one tablespoon of pickle juice. Whisk to combine. The mixture will get lumpy-er before it gets smooth and creamy— don’t panic! That’s normal, just keep going.
  4. Whisk in one tablespoon of mustard (or a little more if you really like mustard, I found one tablespoon to be enough for me). Is your mixture still lumpy? Mine too. Ready for the magic transformation?
  5. Whisk in ¼ cup mayonnaise. That should be better in terms of texture. 
  6. Add two teaspoons of olive oil, and salt and pepper to taste. 
  7. If you want your deviled eggs to look nice and fancy, put the yolk mixture in a ziplock bag and cut the corner. Use the makeshift piping bag to make beautiful swirling centers to your deviled eggs. Garnish with flakey sea salt and freshly cracked black pepper. 

Notes

Feel free to substitute the recommended mustard for your favorite.

When I made this recipe I used the juice of one whole lime, but it was a little tart. If you don't mind that, try using the whole lime.

I really recommend keeping the olive oil in this recipe.

Please treat yourself to getting some quality salt and pepper. Not only do they make a huge difference in this particular recipe, but will really elevate every dish you make! For more information on the importance of using quality salt, read Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat by Samin Nosrat.

Meet Sarah

Sarah Ruhlman is the founder of SarahScoop.com. Contact: sarah@sarahscoop.com

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